Research Submissions

Sensory Hypersensitivity Symptoms in Migraine With vs Without Aura: Results From the American Registry for Migraine Research

Talia A. Pearl BA

Talia A. Pearl BA

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA

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Gina Dumkrieger MS

Gina Dumkrieger MS

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA

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Catherine D. Chong PhD

Catherine D. Chong PhD

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA

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David W. Dodick MD

David W. Dodick MD

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA

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Todd J. Schwedt MD

Corresponding Author

Todd J. Schwedt MD

Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA

Address all correspondence to T.J. Schwedt, Mayo Clinic, 5777 E Mayo Boulevard, Phoenix, AZ 85054, USA, email: [email protected]

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First published: 22 January 2020
Citations: 17

Conflict of Interest: Talia Pearl has no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Gina Dumkrieger has no conflicts of interest to disclose. Catherine Chong received support from Amgen.

David Dodick Consulting: Amgen, University Health Network, Daniel Edelman Inc, Autonomic technologies, Axsome, Allergan, Alder, Biohaven, Charleston Laboratories, Promius, Eli Lilly, eNeura, Neurolief, Novartis, Ipsen, Impel, Satsuma, Supernus, Theranica, Teva, WL Gore, Nocira, XoC, Zosano, Upjohn (Division of Pfizer), Pieris, Revance, Equinox, Salvia, Amzak Health. Honoraria: Foresite Capital, ZP Opco, Oppenheimer, Association of Translational Medicine, Healthlogix, Medicom Worldwide, Medlogix Communications, Mednet, Electrocore, Miller Medical, PeerView, WebMD Health/Medscape, Chameleon, Academy for Continued Healthcare Learning, Sun Pharma (India), Universal meeting management, Haymarket, Global Scientific Communications, Global Life Sciences, Global Access Meetings, UpToDate (Elsevier), Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Wolters Kluwer Health. Research Support: Department of Defense, National Institutes of Health, Henry Jackson Foundation, Sperling Foundation, American Migraine Foundation, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Stock Options/Shareholder/Patents/Board of Directors: Aural analytics, Healint, Theranica, Second Opinion/Mobile Health, Epien (Options/Board), Nocira, Matterhorn/Ontologics (Options/Board), King-Devick Technologies (Options/Board), Precon Health (Options/Board). Patent 17189376.1-1466:vTitle: Botulinum Toxin Dosage Regimen for Chronic Migraine Prophylaxis.

Todd Schwedt received research support from the American Migraine Foundation, Henry Jackson Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, U.S. Department of Defense, and Amgen. Within the past 12 months, he has served as a consultant or advisory board member for Alder, Allergan, Amgen, Dr Reddy's, Ipsen Bioscience, Novartis, Teva, and XoC. He holds stock options in Aural Analytics, Nocira, and Second Opinion.

Funding: American Migraine Foundation, Office of Medical Student Research at Washington University School of Medicine.
Disclaimers: The data have been supplied by the American Registry for Migraine Research (ARMR). The interpretation and reporting of these data are the responsibility of the authors and in no way should be seen as an official interpretation, endorsement by or position of the American Registry for Migraine Research.

Abstract

Background and Objectives

Migraine with aura (MwA) is associated with increased brain hyper-responsiveness to visual stimuli and increased visual network connectivity relative to migraine without aura (MwoA). Despite this, prior studies have provided conflicting results regarding whether MwA is associated with higher photophobia symptom scores compared to MwoA. The relationships between MwA and other types of sensory hypersensitivity, such as phonophobia and cutaneous allodynia (CA), have not been previously investigated. The purpose of this cross-sectional observational study was to investigate whether MwA is associated with greater symptoms of photophobia, phonophobia, and CA compared to MwoA.

Methods

This analysis included 321 migraine patients (146 MwA; 175 MwoA) who had been enrolled into the American Registry for Migraine Research. The diagnosis of either MwoA or MwA was determined by headache specialists using ICHD diagnostic criteria. Patients completed the Photosensitivity Assessment Questionnaire, the Hyperacusis Questionnaire, and the Allodynia Symptom Checklist. Mean or median values were compared between groups. Regression models were created to analyze the relationship between MwA with photophobia scores, hyperacusis scores, and the presence of interictal CA.

Results

Those with MwA had higher mean photophobia scores than those with MwoA (4.1 vs 3.0, P = .0003). MwA was positively associated with photophobia symptom severity (B = 0.50 [SE = 0.14], P = .0003), after controlling for age, patient sex, and headache frequency. Aura was not associated with hyperacusis symptom severity (B = 0.07 [SE = 0.08], P = .346) or the presence of interictal CA (OR 1.33 [95% CI 0.70-2.53], P = .381).

Conclusion

MwA is associated with higher photophobia symptom scores compared to MwoA. Aura is not associated with greater hyperacusis or interictal allodynia scores. These findings complement prior imaging and neurophysiologic studies that demonstrated MwA to be associated with hyper-responsiveness of brain visual processing regions. The findings suggest that MwA is associated specifically with visual hypersensitivity, as opposed to being associated with a general hypersensitivity to multiple types of sensory stimuli.